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20120901
20120930
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> it was an unhappy time for him freur years ago. a moment of great triumph. >> important for the united states was elect barack obama. >> charlie:how would you define the relationship other than they need each other. >> i think they have genuine respect for each other. they talk more than you think. i think that was a process that built up after what was a contentious set of primaries. but i think from the moment that president obama got into office, president clinton really tried to do his best to support him when they reached out he always helped. >> charlie:that's not necessarily the story you hear, john. people say that the president has said -- former president he got more phone calls from george bush than he did from barack obama in the first year or 2. >> i think if you asked him that question today he would say they have a very serious, respectful relationship and they talk and they. >> charlie:but the point is what people around him say and people who know his thoughts said. >> a lot of people like to trade in that kind of gossip. but i know the reality. the reality is, you know, bara
, there is another great book called "the united states of appalachia." it is an analysis of our culture. giving us the culture that we all have in the historic perspective on that. that was there. it was clearly in me and was never going to leave. when i came to california, there was an affinity i had to two or three generations earlier, the steinbeck, to california, they were ostracized. buck owens used to have a chip on his shoulder. after he died, i read something. what he told me one time was about the shame he felt about thatfamily being so pouor they had one toothbrush. i swore i would never be the sport ever again in my life. -- be this poor ever again in my life. we are shaped by all of those disparate elements in our life. i started listening, the palomino was a famous nightclub. a world-famous country nightclub that started in the early 1950's. everybody stops there and played. the owner told me one night, i was really proud for him that i was able to pull in to that night club. down the block, they were lined up. we were in his office and he had a safe open. he watched me over the last
actually come in and wave your flag. being from another country, clearly you are in the united states of america, and the thing america allows you to do is to be able to -- you are waving the flag to say, we are here in america, and we made it, so the saying america loves you to be is it is the country of opportunity, so even when you go to the boxing matches, the fighter is in america, so you are proud to be in america, so i never look at us immigrants -- you have what is called the american dream, so without the american you would not have america, so it was important. when we wave the flag and we allow you to wave the flag, and when you come to the restaurants with us, we participate in the food. we all participate in the parades together, so i do not consider myself as an outsider, i am waving the flag because i am not american. i am waving the slide because i am happy to be part of the american dream. in tavis: it jumped out on me and when we talk about the topic. it has always been hot subject. the immigration debate never seems to cover certain americans for certain persons fro
that election. people are going to vote for the person who is going to be president of the united states. can the vice president held? yes, but i think we overblow it, thinking it is going to alter the broad base. -- broad base. tavis: what is your sense of whether there is an international issue that might change this race? >> i always say if something they have been in existence, and you live with that uncertainty. that being said, i do not think that winds up being a new issue for most voters. i would say if you look at previous elections, a foreign- policy rises to the back burner issue. only times of relative domestic tranquillity as the economy seem to be doing well. other times foreign policy does not make it to the back burner. doesn't matter a little biscuits? sure, but i think this election is about the economy first, the economy second, the economy third, and anything else to be honest. tavis: good to have you on the show. thanks for your work. >> it is always a pleasure. tavis: up next, iyanla vanzant. stay with us. pleased to welcome iyanla vanzant. she just kicked off a series c
of in the united states so they," ok, i am going to be on this guys decide," it stiffens the spine -- i am going to be on this guy's side." when the tony blair government was elected in lint -- in england, the world should not act like this, but it does -- i had been a labour party guy, and some of these people were friends of mine. there was someone i had been involved with, and we were both involved in the campaign for elected moral reform. we knew each other from that. and he became really passionate. he came to the foreign office. he said, "we are going to get it fixed. leave it to me." the support of that and the administration is what brought them to the negotiating table and got it solved. tavis: how do you fix a fatwa? >> some broad think, where anybody can get outraged and carry it out. actually, in all of those years, the only threat to me and to everyone else was the threat from the iranian state. that is not to say it was not a dangerous threat. persons being dispatched by the iranian state. there was never any sense of any other danger. nobody else ever got involved. to standing dow
fairly. that needs to be changed and i will chaipg it when i'm president of the united states of america. [applause] >> signing this bill today is to send a clear message making our economy work is making sure it works for everybody. ♪ >> charlie:so it's red and green. >> there's sew few ads maybe 1%h both parties because we are twied. the reason it's pow woreful. you hear his voice, see him speaking and see the record. >> charlie:you see the promise and the performance. >> exactly. the next ad to look at america for prosperity. 2008 obama voters discuss why they have become disillusioned with his presidency. >> in 2008 i voted for barack obama. he was new had new ideas. now that we've given obama a fair chance and he's not able to do what we need him to do. >> he's doingen mediocre job. economy is the same. >> obama said he was going to help the middle class. that's where i am. instead it has hurt me. >> i have not seen the change i believed in. >> american for prosperity is responsible for the content of this advertising. >> charlie:what did we see. >> i didn't see the hope and chaip
and afghanistan, to become the government, and i'm not sure any country, either the united states or i don't hear of anyone else, who's willing to take on that responsibility. the other proposal is to arm the opposition. that's certainly something you can look at, but make sure you know who you're arming and what you're liable to get from that solution. then provide safe havens for people in other countries may be a possibility, but i think stick with the political, diplomatic and economic track for the time being. tavis: again, i'm so tempted to continue picking your brain about these hotspots around the globe, but want to, again, as i promised, get to the text. there are a number of things, a number of political issues, for that matter, decisions that you've made in your life that you finally open up and talk about in the text, which allows me to some degree to continue this line of questioning. for example, you talked for the first time extensively about the un speech, and everybody knows when you say colin powell and the un speech, you know what we're talking about. speaking of lessons learne
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)